The Compact Muon Solenoid Experiment

The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment is a large particle physics detector located at the interaction point number 5 along the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ring, at CERN. The goal of the CMS experiment is to investigate a wide range of physics, including the search for the Higgs boson, extra dimensions, and possible hints of dark matter particles.

CMS has a cylindrical symmetry around the beam pipe, with an overall length of 22 m and a diameter of 15 m and it is made of a sequence of substructures designed to measure the properties of the particles coming out from the proton-proton collisions delivered by LHC.
Starting from the inner part, the main subdetectors that are contained in CMS are: the tracking system (made of layers of silicon pixels and silicon strips), the electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL), the hadronic calorimeter (HCAL) and the muon chambers. The tracker and both the calorimeters are placed inside a superconducting solenoid which creates a magnetic field of 3.8 T, while the muon system remains outside.
The innermost tracking system allows the reconstruction of tracks and interaction vertices, while the calorimeters are devoted to the energy measurement of electrons, photons and hadrons. Moreover, the magnetic field produced by the solenoid allows, through the curvature of their tracks, an excellent measurement of particles momentum.

Image credit: (c) CERN



Image credit: Wikipedia




Image credit: (c) CERN