Public Lecture and Special Colloquia

There will be special lectures and colloquia complementing the program of SUSY07 and the PreSUSY-Summer School. These lectures will take place in Audimax, Strasse am Forum 1.

Extraordinary Colloquium From Symmetry to Supersymmetry Prof. Julius Wess Tuesday, 24.7.2007, 5.15pm
Extraordinary Colloqium The Universe is a Strange Place Prof. Frank Wilczek Wednesday, 25.7.2007, 5.15pm
Public Lecture The Quantum and the Cosmos Prof. Edward Kolb Friday, 27.7.2007, 8.00pm

SUSY07 Public Lecture
The Quantum and the Cosmos
Prof. Edward Kolb (Fermilab)
Friday, 27.7.2007, 8.00 pm, Audimax, Strasse am Forum 1
Download Slides
Watch/Download Movie (Part I)
Watch/Download Movie (Part II)

Long before the emergence of planets, stars, or galaxies, the universe consisted of an exploding quantum soup of "elementary" particles. Encoded in this formless, shapeless soup were seeds of cosmic structure, which over billions of years grew into the beautiful and complex universe we observe today. The lecture will explore the connection between the "inner space" of the quantum and the "outer space" of the cosmos. The inner space/outer space connection may hold the key to the nature of the dark matter holding together our galaxy and the mysterious dark energy pulling apart our universe.

    Download Public Lecture Poster (313KB) pdf
    Download Public Lecture Poster (40MB) pdf
    Download Public Lecture Poster (adobe illustrator) (41MB) ai

SUSY07 Extraordinary Colloquium
From Symmetry to Supersymmetry
Prof. Julius Wess (em.) (LMU Munich)
Tuesday, 24.7.2007, 5.15 pm Audimax, Strasse am Forum 1
Watch/Download Movie (Part I)
Watch/Download Movie (Part II)

Symmetries play an important role in physics, since they define conservation laws. There is a surprising way of combining space-time symmetry with the spin of a particle, an internal symmetry. This is called Supersymmetry, which postulates that every particle we observe has a massive "shadow" particle partner. For example, for every quark there may be a so-called "squark" tagging along. With these new particles all forces become equally strong at high energy, thus paving the way for a Grand Unified Theory (GUT).

Abput the speaker:
In 1974 Julius Wess developed at the University of Karlsruhe, together with Bruno Zumino, Supersymmetry in 4 dimensions. In 1991 he went to Munich to become Director of the MPI and professor at the LMU.

SUSY07 Extraordinary Colloquium
The Universe is a Strange Place
Prof. Frank Wilczek (Nobel Laureate 2004, MIT)
Wednesday, 25.7.2007, 5.15 pm, Audimax, Strasse am Forum 1
Watch/Download Movie (Part I)
Watch/Download Movie (Part II)

Twentieth century physics involves demonstrating the existence of a topsy-turvy reality: for instance, that such sub-atomic particles as quarks and gluons, which have little or no mass, "orchestrate" themselves into not just protons and neutrons but massive objects, like you and me. But in cosmology we can't account for much of the mas: 70% of this mass is in "dark energy", which is pushing the universe apart. Wilczek hopes that explanations for the dark stuff will emerge through improving equations, unifying theories of different interactions and extending their symmetries. Beautifying equations leads not to ugly consequences but beautiful surprises, he concludes.

About the speaker:
Wilczek was 21 years old and a graduate student at Princeton University when he and David Gross defined the properties of gluons, which hold atomic nuclei together. In October 2004 Wilczek shared the Nobel Prize in Physics with Gross and H. David Politzer for this work.

    Download Colloquia Poster (264KB) pdf
    Download Colloquia Poster (32MB) pdf
    Download Colloquia Poster (adobe illustrator) (33MB) ai